Can Dogs Drink Eggnog

Can Dogs Drink Eggnog?

Holidays are the best because they come with many delicious snacks, bakeries, foods, and drinks. Eggnog is a traditional winter drink that you can find in many homes during cold days. That is why some dog owners might be wondering whether eggnog is safe for dogs to drink or not.

Dogs should not drink eggnog because it is made of lots of fat, sugar, milk, raw eggs, and alcohol. Another dangerous ingredient is nutmeg that you can find in eggnog. Nutmeg can be lethal for dogs, and the other ingredients listed will definitely give your dog some hard time with his stomach.

Just like you are, your dog might be obsessed with this creamy and delicious drink even though he has a sensitive stomach. Since he cannot control what he wants to drink, your dog might slurp some of the eggnogs that have been left unattended in the kitchen or on the dinner table.

However, your dog’s stomach cannot tolerate such a heavy drink. If your dog drank eggnog, there are some things that you should know because your dog might need to pay the vet a visit for some cases of drinking eggnog.

Let’s further explore what is in eggnog and what are the consequences of dogs drinking this beverage.

What is in Eggnog?

The most dangerous ingredient used in eggnog is alcohol. Some eggnog recipes use rum, bourbon, or brandy, and some can be made alcohol-free. The alcohol percentage used in these drinks can be over 40, which is very dangerous for dogs to consume.

If the eggnog your dog consumed had alcohol in it, make sure to find out the brand name and the alcohol percentage. This information might come in handy when you go to the vet.

Dogs can become intoxicated when they drink alcohol. Ethanol that is present in alcoholic drinks is absorbed and transferred to the blood, and this process can happen faster than how it happens in humans.

It depends on how much alcohol there was in the eggnog, but it can take approximately 30 minutes or shorter for your dog to become intoxicated. When dogs become intoxicated, they will vomit, have diarrhea and lack of coordination, and take damage to their central nervous system.

Among other possible symptoms, we can list the difficulty of breathing, tremors, abnormal blood acidity, coma, and seizures. If the eggnog your dog slurped was alcohol-free, then you have nothing to worry about the effects of alcohol.

However, alcohol is not the only dangerous ingredient of eggnogs. Other ingredients that can cause damage to your dog’s digestive system are milk, cream, eggs, and nutmeg. These ingredients can make your canine friend nauseous, but it also depends on your dog’s size and the amount of the ingredients listed.

If your dog has a sensitive stomach, it is quite easy for him to get affected by milk, cream, raw eggs, and nutmeg. He can experience vomiting and diarrhea right after drinking eggnogs.

Eggnog can be made of milk, light cream, heavy cream, or a combination of all of them. All of these ingredients are very high in fat. High fat can cause diarrhea and pancreatitis. Because of the lactose content of the milk, diarrhea can be something inescapable in dogs after drinking eggnog.

You cannot imagine eggnog without eggs. Most recipes use raw eggs, and they are very dangerous because they are known to be the cause of Salmonella contamination and possible food poisoning. If you were having some store-bought eggnog, finding raw eggs in it is pretty low since they are pasteurized.

As the last possible dangerous ingredient, the eggnog your dog drank probably had some nutmeg in it. Nutmeg is a spice closely associated with holiday bakeries and drinks such as eggnog. However, nutmeg can be poisonous and lethal for dogs if consumed.

The toxicity of nutmeg comes from the toxin that is called myristicin, and very small doses of nutmeg are not likely to cause direct damage to the dogs. However, if your dog is showing some symptoms such as lip-smacking, drooling, loss of appetite, upset stomach, and decreased activity, it means that he was affected by the nutmeg that was present in the eggnog.

Can Dogs Drink Eggnog

What will Happen if Your Dog Drinks Eggnog?

Eggnog is full of fat, sugar, raw eggs, milk, spices, and alcohol. Do not let your dog it no matter what. The consequences might be too heavy for you to handle because some of the ingredients used in eggnog are toxic for dogs and can be lethal if consumed.

Nutmeg is used in the traditional holiday drink that is called eggnog. Nutmeg can be lethal to dogs. That is why you should avoid giving eggnogs to your dog.  If your dog accidentally had some eggnog, make sure to find out how much nutmeg was used. Usually, small doses of nutmeg do not hurt anyone, but it is always a good idea to check.

Whether your dog will get poisoned or not by drinking eggnog depends on the size of your dog and the amount of eggnog he drank. What that means is, your dog can get poisoned if he consumes eggnog in large amounts, but he can be fine if he only took a sip.

Conclusion: Can Dogs Drink Eggnog?

Eggnog is full of fat, sugar, raw eggs, milk, spices, and alcohol. Do not let your dog it no matter what. The consequences might be too heavy for you to handle because some of the ingredients used in eggnog are toxic for dogs and can be lethal if consumed.

Nutmeg is used in the traditional holiday drink that is called eggnog. Nutmeg can be lethal to dogs. That is why you should avoid giving eggnogs to your dog.  If your dog accidentally had some eggnog, make sure to find out how much nutmeg was used. Usually, small doses of nutmeg do not hurt anyone, but it is always a good idea to check.

Whether your dog will get poisoned or not by drinking eggnog depends on the size of your dog and the amount of eggnog he drank. What that means is, your dog can get poisoned if he consumes eggnog in large amounts, but he can be fine if he only took a sip.

Alaaddin Sarac

I've been an avid dog enthusiast since childhood. I started this blog in hopes of helping owners find answers to questions I had after owning my first dog. This website was created as a way to share our love for all things canine with the world. From choosing the best food for your older dog to get the best beds for your tail-wagger, I aim to give you the information you need to give your dog the best care throughout his entire life.